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THE HPV IMMUNISATION PROGRAMME

In over 10 years, millions of girls have been immunised against HPV as part of the NHS National Immunisation Programme (NIP).
From September 2019 boys aged 12-13 years can also be immunised against HPV as part of the NIP.

THE HPV VACCINE IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR BOYS AS PART OF THE NIP

WHY ARE BOYS NOW BEING GIVEN THE HPV VACCINE AS PART OF THE NIP?

  • Just like girls, boys are at risk of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers, like anal cancer. Immunising them will help protect them from certain types of HPV infections that may develop into cancers during adulthood
  • Scientific research suggests that adding boys to the NIP will help strengthen the “community immunity” we’ve achieved from immunising girls

Community immunity:

When enough people in a community are vaccinated it makes it harder for a disease to pass between people who have not been vaccinated.
Community immunity is really important because it means that vaccinated people help protect those who can’t get vaccinated e.g. because they’re too ill.

Both boys and girls can receive the HPV vaccine for free at school as part of the NHS National Immunisation Programme (12-13 years old, school year 8)

For maximum protection, two doses of the vaccine are given, 6 - 12 months apart.

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%

OF ANAL CANCER CASES ARE CAUSED BY TYPES OF HPV COVERED BY THE NIP

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%

OF CASES OF CERVICAL CANCER ARE CAUSED BY HPV INFECTION

  • Over 70% of cervical cancers are caused by HPV types covered by the NIP

HOW DOES HPV CAUSE CANCERS?

Certain types of long-lasting HPV infection can lead to changes in HPV-infected cells that make them divide more than usual and grow out of control. This can lead to cancers of the anus, vulva, vagina and cervix, as well as pre-cancerous lesions.

WHY IS THE HPV VACCINE GIVEN TO 12-13 YEAR OLDS?

  • It's best to get immunised before being exposed to HPV
  • The body's immune response to the HPV vaccine will be strongest when given at the recommended age
Find out more about the HPV vaccine